LTV and DCR Are Not the Only Determining Factors for Defaults on Commercial Mortgages

Note: This article was originally published in Winter 2014 issue of  CREFC World Magazine published by the Commercial Real Estate Finance Council.

By:
Steve Guggenmos, Senior Director, Freddie Mac
Jun Li, Director, Freddie Mac
Yu Guan, Analyst, Freddie Mac
Malay Bansal, Senior Director, Freddie Mac

For simplicity, some models used by CMBS investors assume that the non-recourse borrower will default immediately if the DCR falls below 1.0 or LTV goes above 100 (percent). This is sometimes referred to as “ruthless default” behavior. In reality, however, borrowers do not choose to default just because DCR is below 1.0 or LTV is higher than 100. This article examines some historical data and attempts to look at various factors that have an impact on the borrower’s decision to default, and presents historical default rates for each category.

Using different default rates for the different categories may be a better approach for scenario analysis for CMBS investors than trying to use fixed cutoff numbers for DCR and LTV to examine each loan to determine if it will default or not.  An important underlying factor that motivates borrower behavior is the option value embedded in owning the real property.

Also, borrower selection impacts ruthlessness.  Market expertise helps borrowers measure the benefits of supporting an underperforming property based on potential future upside.  Further, key to the decision to support the property is the borrower’s access to capital and overall liquidity – without which there is no ability to subsidize the property until the market improves.

Introduction

As part of their investment analysis, CMBS Investors run various scenarios of changes in economic conditions, cap rates, vacancies, NOIs, etc. The resulting DCR and LTV are used to decide if the loan will default in that scenario and what the loss severity will be in case of default. If DCR falls below 1.0, that clearly increases the likelihood of default during the loan term as borrowers are required to pay out-of-pocket to cover property expenses.  When the property value is below the loan amount default is more likely and losses will be higher in case of default. Also, if the LTV is above 100 at maturity, the loan is not likely to not qualify for a new loan without putting more equity into the property, and hence there may be a maturity default.

In practice borrowers do not choose to default just because DCR is below 1.0 or LTV is higher than 100. There is an option value to owning real property that impacts borrower behavior. The option value captures the possibility of upside in the future.

Investors are aware of the option value. However, if 1.0 DCR and 100 LTV are not the cut off points, what are the levels that drive borrower behavior? Even more complex models must address this question as well. In this research we focus on the multifamily loans and look at the borrower default behavior in loans in both CMBS and Freddie Mac collateral.

See full article at: Freddie Mac Research page, or CREFC World website.

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